Friday, October 11, 2013

Running Programs, Schedules, and training guides for 5K's, 10K's, Halfs, and Marathons

Becoming a Racing Runner
Tips, Running Programs, and Schedules for :
5K's
10K's
Half Marathons
Full Marathons

A lot of my friends have caught the running bug and have been asking me about my favorite pacing programs or running websites.

Doing some research on my own has led me to feel slightly overwhelmed, SO I figured I'd make some what of a running " bank" of websites on this post of running plans that I think are good for many, many races out there whether it be a 5K, 10K, etc etc and whether you're beginning or want to break a personal record with a upcoming race.  

All of these programs can be printed out, don't require money, and are pretty easy to follow, which is why I've included them in my post. So many can be overwhelming and some websites even make you pay for their program. These are basic and can be tailored to your level!

Now I don't call myself an expert at ALL, I just know that If I could have everything in one place, I would appreciate it...SO..here it goes!

A great website to look up races in your area

Also google the name of your city and insert running club afterwards. A LOT of cities now have their own running club facebook group or website that post upcoming events in the local area.

Some trips and tricks I've learned along the way!


  1. Signing up for a race is probably the best running motivator. When you're putting in the hours of running, if you have that race in the back of your head pushing you, you're a lot less likely to make excuses for reasons why you shouldn't run that day.
  2. Fine a runny buddy or a club. I have more motivation to run, and I run more frequently, if I know someone is counting on me to show up or help them as well.
  3. Make sure you have decent equipment! I'm not telling you to go out and buy $200 shoes, but if you injure your feet because you skimped on some shoes, you've pretty much trained for nothing. Go to a sports store (not Walmart) and find some adequate shoes that are made for the purpose of running. (FYI, some have to go up a 1/2 of size or a full size due to swelling after running. Losing a toenail due to tight shoes is NOT fun)
  4. Start slow! If you've only ran once a month, don't plan to do a marathon in 4 weeks! Pace your time out. The last thing you want to do is sign up for a race and want to train so fast you injure yourself. You're out all the money and possibly for quite some time.
  5. Make your first races FUN!! The reason why I listed SO many of the Disney races is because I LOVE them. I knew I wasn't going to be fast, so why push myself through 26.2 miles in a race where I would be miserable. The Disney races are AMAZING novice races. They only have a pace requirement of 16 minutes per mile (you can WALK faster than 16 minutes per mile). It's very organized AND you get to run through the Disney park and meet the characters. I did my first half AND my first full marathon at a Disney race. I wasn't too worried about my times, I just wanted to have fun, which of course I did! So, pick a race you will enjoy for your first long distance race, whether it be the Disney's, the Rock and Roll, or a very scenic race like Los Angeles. :) 




5K TRAINING ( 3.1 Miles) or Beginning running training

I really liked this website, It has a great, straightforward information


This is a very simple program designed for those who are new to running and would like to participate in their first 5K.

Hal Higdon's website (which I will be referencing a lot) is one of my FAVORITE websites. Not only does he give you running schedules, he gives you multiple schedules for each race depending what your goal is .


His 5K training includes plans for the following:

Novice Training for your first 5K
This is an eight-week training schedule to help get you to the finish line. It assumes that you have no major health problems, are in reasonably good shape, and have done at least some jogging or walking.

you probably are not going to be content to merely finish your 5-K race. You'd like to finish it with grace, in style and maybe improve your time (known as setting a Personal Record, or PR) In order to achieve full benefit from this program, you probably need to have been running 3-4 days a week for the last year or two and averaging 15-20 miles weekly, It helps if you have an understanding of the concepts of speedwork.

an individual who has been running for several years and who has run numerous 5-K races and races at other distances, there comes a time when you want to seek maximum performance. Regardless of your age or ability, you would like to run as fast as you possibly can. You want a training program that will challenge you. Here it is!Let me state what you probably know already. To achieve maximum performance, you need to improve your endurance and your speed. In order to achieve full benefit from this program, before starting you probably need to be running 4-5 days a week, 20-30 miles a week or more, and at least have an understanding of the concepts of speedwork. If not, drop back to one of the other programs.

If your only interest is to stroll 5-K at a comfortable pace, you probably don't need any particular training program. Just make sure you have a comfortable pair of walking shoes and do enough walks of at least 15-30 minutes in the last month or two before the 5-K to make sure you won't have any trouble finishing the 3.1-mile distance.

I just really LOVE his programs. They are straight forward and they are very basic. 

Jeff Galloway's 5K (and 10K) training program


Some 5K races you don't want to miss:

  A very easy 5K, their website's description:
"Less about your 10-minute-mile and more about having the time of your life, The Color Run is a five-kilometer, un-timed race in which thousands of participants are doused from head to toe in different colors at each kilometer. The fun continues at the finish line with a gigantic “Finish Festival,” using more colored powder to create happiness and lasting memories, not to mention millions of vivid color combinations. Trust us, this is the best post-5k party on the planet!

You can honestly walk the whole thing and say " I finished a 5K!"
Here is a training program I found to get you ready (if you want to run this)





Some of the BEST 5k's for family: races that run through Disney World and Disney Land Parks, Great medals, and lots of fun for the family!




Other races:



Pretty much it just depends on what your area offers. Most major cities offer some type of 5K around the holidays.

10K TRAINING (6.2 Miles)

 OK, so say you've ran a couple 5K's and you are ready to add a little more of a challenge to your race.


Here is Jeff Galloway's 10K (and 5K) training program


Hal Higdon's Training Programs:
 A new runner to the 10K program and just want to finish

You should be running five to six times a week, averaging 15-25 miles weekly training. You probably also should have run a half dozen or more races at distances between the 5-K and the Half-Marathon.

Advanced Program
individuals who compete regularly in races up to 10-K or beyond and who want to improve their performances. You should be capable of running 30 to 60 minutes a day, five to seven days a week and have a basic understanding of how to do speedwork.

If your only interest is to stroll 10-K at a comfortable pace, you probably don't need any particular training program. Just make sure you have a comfortable pair of walking shoes and do enough walks of at least 45-90 minutes in the last month or two before the 10-K to make sure you won't have any trouble finishing the 6.2-mile distance

New Balances 10K Program:


Some fun 10K Races:



I had a hard time finding many other 10K's that were nationally known. This would be another time where it would be best to find local races from your running club or searching the link (posted above) at Running USA


HALF MARATHON TRAINING (13.1, AND MY FAVORITE RACE!)

ALRIGHT, my FAVORITE distance race :) Runners World Magazine says "if you can run 3 miles, you can run a half marathon).

This is becoming one of the most popular type of races to run in the past 5 years. 

There are many, many races that have half marathons and there are lots of training programs out there!

Hal Higdon's Training Program


His training program is broken down into 5 different schedules based on your level of running the half marathon

The following schedule assumes you have the ability to run 3 miles, three to four times a week.

Some of these half marathoners are people moving up from the 5-K or 10-K, but I suspect more of them (more of you) are runners who have run a marathon or two,

Those who want to improve their performances. You should be capable of running 30 to 60 minutes a day, five to seven days a week, have competed in at least a few 5-K and 10-K races, if not a marathon, and at least be willing to consider the possibility that some speedwork might help you improve.

individuals who compete regularly in 5-K, 10-K, half-marathon and even marathon races and who want to improve their performances. You should be capable of running 30 to 60 minutes a day, five to seven days a week and have a basic understanding of how to do speedwork.



Plans Based on Training Time Till Race Day

Sometimes you want to base your schedule off of the time you have until your major race, here is a website that has schedules for a 12, 16, and 20 week half marathon training schedule.


Run Keeper is a great App you can download (will talk more about apps below) but it also has a great website designed with a varied amount of plans based on your level of running fitness, schedule of race day, and possible finish time.

Run Keeper 1/2 Marathon Training Plans

Beginner's 10 week 1/2 Marathon Schedule



 


MARATHON TRAINING


I actually found this book at a goodwill ( I WAS SUPER EXCITED) . I met Jeff at the WDW Princess Half and am pretty happy with this book. Some running books, I feel, are extremely basic "make sure you have good running shoes, drink water..blah blah" most of that info is completely available online now. This book had some GREAT running schedules.




Hal Higdon's Marathon Training Programs

    A Simple 30-Week Schedule for Beginning Runners: I DESIGNED THIS PROGRAM FOR NEW RUNNERS, specifically those individuals new to the sport of long distance running who would like to start in the spring to get ready to run a marathon in the fall. Individuals who plan to get serious about their training and dedicate six or seven months to training for their first marathon.

     Used by runners preparing to run their first marathons. If you googled "Marathon Training," you probably found this program at the top of the list, favored even over programs available on major Web sites, such as RunnersWorld.com. Is this your first marathon? Have you only begun to run in the last month or two? Novice 1 will get you to the starting line, and you can't get to the finish line unless you get to the start. If you have been running for a year or more and have run a number of races from 5-K to the half marathon, you might want to consider Novice 2, although many experienced runners also favor Novice 1, because of the (relatively) gentle way it prepares you to run 26 miles 385 yards.

     A slight step upwards in difficulty from Novice 1. It is designed for people with some background as a runner, whether or not they have run a marathon before. Runners differ greatly in ability, but ideally before starting a marathon program, you should have been running about a year. You should be able to comfortably run distances between 3 and 6 miles. You should be training 3-5 days a week, averaging 15-25 miles a week. You should have run an occasional 5-K or half marathon race. It is possible to run a marathon with less of a training base (particularly if you come from another sport), but the higher your fitness level, the easier this 18-week program will be. If this description fits you, you are probably ready to use Novice 2 for your first marathon, or for subsequent marathons, but don't feel embarrassed about dropping back to Novice 1. Novice 2 is nearly identical to Novice 1, but there are some differences, mainly: 1) You do pace runs on Wednesdays, and 2) the mileage is somewhat higher. Novice 2 consists of several different increments.

     The Intermediate 1 program offers a slight jump in difficulty from the Novice programs. You begin in Week 1 with a long run of 8 miles instead of 6 miles. You thus get to 20 miles for your long run by Week 13, which permits a second 20-miler in Week 15. Midweek mileage is slightly higher, but instead of cross-training on the weekends, you get more serious about your running and do a second run of 5-8 miles, often at marathon race pace. You now do your cross-training on Mondays, instead of taking the day off. Intermediate 2 offers still another jump in difficulty, but let’s concentrate for now on Intermediate 1.


5. Intermediate-2-Training-Program
   Intermediate 2 offers a slight jump in difficulty from Intermediate 1. You begin in Week 1 with a long run of 10 miles instead of 8 miles. You thus get to 20 miles for your long run by Week 11, which permits a third 20-miler in Week 15. Midweek mileage is slightly higher, but instead of cross-training on the weekends, you get more serious about your running and do a second run of 5-10 miles, often at marathon race pace. You now do your cross-training on Mondays, instead of taking the day off. Incidentally, Intermediate 2 is the ideal training program for those doing the popular "Goofy" run at the Walt Disney World Marathon, where you run a half on Saturday followed by a full marathon on Sunday. This program's 10-mile pace run followed by a 20-mile long run offers the perfect jumping-off platform for racing 13-26.

6. Advanced-1-Training-Program
      The training programs for Advanced 1 marathoners follow a progressive buildup--similar to that for novice and Intermediate runners, except you start at 10 miles and peak with three 20-milers. There is also more training at marathon pace (usually Saturdays, the day before Sunday long runs). Please note that we do not recommend doing your long runs at marathon pace. That adds too much stress, particularly when coupled with the speed sessions scheduled for Thursdays. If you over train, your performance will suffer.

7. Advanced-2-Training-Program
The training program for Advanced 2 marathoners follows a progressive buildup--similar to that for Novice and Intermediate runners, except you start at 10 miles and peak with three 20-milers. There is also more training at marathon pace (usually Saturdays, the day before Sunday long runs). Please note that we do not recommend doing your long runs at marathon pace. That adds too much stress, particularly when coupled with the speed sessions scheduled for Tuesdays and Thursdays. If you overtrain, your performance will suffer.

Speed sessions consist of hill repeats, interval training and tempo runs in various combinations.  Admittedly, not everybody wants to do speedwork, or enjoys going to the track. If that is your philosophy, you are better off following one of my intermediate programs. The advanced schedules (1 and 2) are designed only for the hard core, those willing to take it to the limit. Only a small percentage of today's runners classify themselves as Advanced or want to follow this demanding a schedule. We track how many runners sign up for my various schedules, and fewer than 10 percent choose Advanced. If that is you, welcome aboard.

   I DESIGNED THIS PROGRAM FOR EXPERIENCED RUNNERS, individuals who have run two or three or more marathons and who would like to improve their times, to achieve Peak Performance, to set a Personal Record (PR), perhaps to score a Boston Marathon qualifying time (BQ).

   Is the schedule below designed only for older runners? Not necessarily, although if you have been running marathons for a number of years, you may have been searching for a program with relatively low mileage and less of a time commitment that will allow you to continue to race 26-milers without getting burned out. Same if you've followed my Novice schedule before and are looking for some variation--particularly a program that will allow you time do some cross-training. If you're a Clydesdale, you also may have come to the conclusion that high-mileage weeks raise the risk of injury too much. You need more rest time. Finally, if you like to run a lot of marathons a year (and it's up to you to define "a lot"), you realize it's impossible to fit more than a couple of 18-week build-ups into your schedule and still have time for recovery between.

   This Boston Bound Training Program is designed specifically for those runners talented or dedicated enough to have qualified for the Boston Athletic Association Marathon. It assumes an already high level of fitness, otherwise you would not have been able to meet Boston's strict qualifying standards. If a long run of 14 miles in only the second week sounds too far, you probably need to pick another training program. Also, unlike my usual 18-week marathon training programs, Boston Bound is only 12 weeks long, beginning in late January for the April race. Its increments are designed to prepare you for the unique challenge that Boston presents. Finally, it includes only a two-week taper, not three as in most of my other marathon programs.

   Here are some training strategies for runners running marathons two, four, six and eight weeks apart. If you're running marathons with an odd number of weeks between (three, five, seven, etc.), simply repeat one of the middle weeks. I have interactive versions of my multiple marathon programs for each of those weeks-between.



Sport Fitness Advisor Beginner Marathon Training Tips


Run Keeper's Marathon Schedule Based on Finishing Time

Marathon Races












Well, I hope this has helped some of you! I'm probably going to refine this and post a little more later on about some ultra runs and some other crazy races (mountain climbs..weeeee..!)

If you have a program you have used in the past, that you really liked, please email me and I'll post it on here with a little caption about how well it worked for you!
Email me @ musicforever04@gmail.com

Thanks!


1 comment:

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